Terrorist network – Capperi http://capperi.net/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 18:04:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://capperi.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T215521.666-150x150.png Terrorist network – Capperi http://capperi.net/ 32 32 United States celebrates 20th anniversary of 9/11 attacks, deadliest on American soil https://capperi.net/united-states-celebrates-20th-anniversary-of-9-11-attacks-deadliest-on-american-soil/ https://capperi.net/united-states-celebrates-20th-anniversary-of-9-11-attacks-deadliest-on-american-soil/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 16:51:58 +0000 https://capperi.net/united-states-celebrates-20th-anniversary-of-9-11-attacks-deadliest-on-american-soil/ Americans solemnly celebrated the 20th anniversary of September 11, 2001 on Saturday, commemorating the dead, calling on heroes and taking stock of the aftermath just weeks after the bloody end of the war in Afghanistan in response to the terrorist attacks. The ceremony at Ground Zero in New York City began exactly two decades after […]]]>

Americans solemnly celebrated the 20th anniversary of September 11, 2001 on Saturday, commemorating the dead, calling on heroes and taking stock of the aftermath just weeks after the bloody end of the war in Afghanistan in response to the terrorist attacks.

The ceremony at Ground Zero in New York City began exactly two decades after the start of the deadliest terrorist act on American soil, the first of four hijacked planes crashing into one of the World Trade Center’s twin towers.

Former US President Barack Obama, left to right, Michelle Obama, US President Joe Biden, Jill Biden and former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg attend a ceremony on Saturday marking the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks , at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York. (Evan Vucci / The Associated Press)

“It was as if an evil specter had descended on our world, but it was also a time when many people were acting beyond the ordinary,” said Mike Low, whose daughter, Sara Low, was a hostess. air in this plane.

“As we continue these 20 years, I feed off a continuing appreciation for all who have become more than just ordinary people,” Low told a crowd including US President Joe Biden and former US Presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton.

The anniversary took place under the veil of a pandemic and in the shadow of the US withdrawal from Afghanistan, now led by the same militants who gave refuge to the 9/11 plotters.

WATCH | Jean Chrétien on the after-seven. 11th:

“It was the start of a new era”: former Prime Minister Jean Chrétien reflects on September 11 and the war in Afghanistan

Former Prime Minister Jean Chrétien joined Power & Politics on Friday to reflect on the 20th anniversary of September 11 and Canada’s role in the war in Afghanistan. 15:16

“It’s hard because you were hoping it would just be another time and another world. But sometimes history starts to repeat itself and not in the best possible way,” said Thea Trinidad, who lost her father. in the attacks, before reading the victims. ‘names at the ceremony.

Loss and inheritance

An image of a man who died in the September 11, 2001 attacks is kept in New York City on Saturday, as people visit the September 11 Memorial on the 20th anniversary of the tragedy. (Mike Segar / Reuters)

Bruce Springsteen and Broadway actors Kelli O’Hara and Chris Jackson performed at the commemoration, but traditionally no politician spoke. In a video released Friday night, Biden addressed the lingering pain of loss, but also highlighted what he called the “central lesson” of 9/11: “That in our most vulnerable … unity is our. greater strength.

Biden was also due to pay homage to two other sites where the 9/11 conspirators crashed planes: the Pentagon in Washington, DC, and a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania. Together, the attacks killed nearly 3,000 people.

At the Pennsylvania site – where passengers and crew fought to regain control of a plane that allegedly targeted the United States Capitol or the White House – former US President George W. Bush said that September 11 had shown that Americans could come together despite their differences.

“What we can be again”

“Much of our politics has become a naked appeal of anger, fear and resentment,” said Bush, who was in power on the day of the attacks. “On the day of America’s trial and mourning, I saw millions of people instinctively grab hold of their neighbor’s hand and rally together.”

Bush said that “this is the truest version of ourselves. This is what we have been and what we can be again.”

A New York firefighter stands at attention on the 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in New York on Saturday. (Ed Jones / The Associated Press)

Calvin Wilson said that a polarized country had “missed the message” of the heroism of the passengers and crew on the flight, including his brother-in-law, LeRoy Homer.

“We are not focusing on the damage. We are not focusing on hate. We are not focusing on retaliation. We are not focusing on revenge,” Wilson said before the ceremony. “We are focused on the good that all of our loved ones have done.”

A person touches the name of a victim on the 9/11 memorial on the 20th anniversary of the September 11, 2001 attacks in New York on Saturday. (Mike Segar / Reuters)

Former US President Donald Trump had planned to be in New York, in addition to commenting on a boxing match in Florida that evening.

The following

Pipers stand at attention Saturday during a ceremony in New York City to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks. (John Minchillo / The Associated Press)

In the aftermath of the attacks, security was redefined, with changes to airport checkpoints, police practices and government oversight powers. For years after, virtually any large-scale explosion, accident or act of violence seemed to raise a terrible question: “Is this terrorism?”

Ideological violence and plots have followed, although federal officials and the public have recently become increasingly concerned about threats from domestic extremists after years of focusing on international terrorist groups.

WATCH | Canadians and the September 11 attacks:

Remembering the escape and the grief 20 years after 9/11

Twenty years later, CBC’s Ioanna Roumeliotis catches up with two Canadians affected by the September 11 attacks. Ron DiFrancesco, who was among the last to escape the Towers, and Kimmy Chedel, whose husband Frank Doyle was unlucky. 8:08

A post-seven. The “war on terror” led to invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, where America’s longest war ended last month with a massive and rushed airlift punctuated by a suicide bombing blamed on an branch of the extremist group Islamic State.

The United States is now concerned that al-Qaeda, the terrorist network behind 9/11, could regroup in Afghanistan.

An American flag is flown at the Pentagon in Washington, DC, at sunrise Saturday, the morning of the 20th anniversary of the terrorist attacks on the United States. (Alex Brandon / The Associated Press)


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9/11 SURVIVOR VOICES: Branchville man says ‘it’s not something to be overcome’ | Local https://capperi.net/9-11-survivor-voices-branchville-man-says-its-not-something-to-be-overcome-local/ https://capperi.net/9-11-survivor-voices-branchville-man-says-its-not-something-to-be-overcome-local/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://capperi.net/9-11-survivor-voices-branchville-man-says-its-not-something-to-be-overcome-local/ Jimeno was released around 11 p.m. McLoughlin the next morning. Jimeno underwent surgeries and a long rehabilitation. But he says his psychological recovery has been more difficult. Petty things made him lose his temper – fueled, he now realizes, by anger over the deaths of colleagues and people rescuers couldn’t help. Sometimes, he said, he […]]]>

Jimeno was released around 11 p.m. McLoughlin the next morning. Jimeno underwent surgeries and a long rehabilitation.

But he says his psychological recovery has been more difficult. Petty things made him lose his temper – fueled, he now realizes, by anger over the deaths of colleagues and people rescuers couldn’t help. Sometimes, he said, he thought about suicide. It took him three years and several therapists to master seizure prevention.

It has helped tell its story in Talks, in Oliver Stone’s 2006 film “World Trade Center” and in Jimeno’s two recently published books – the illustrious children’s “Immigrant, American, Survivor” and “Sunrise. Through the Darkness “. on trauma management.

The Colombian-born US Navy veteran hopes people will see in his story “the resilience of the human soul, the American spirit” and the power of good people that intensifies in bad times.

September 11 “motivates me to live a better life,” says Jimeno, 53, of Chester, New Jersey. “The way I can honor those we have lost and those who have been injured is to live fruitful lives. To be an example to others that 9/11 did not destroy us.”

‘It’s almost like being reborn’

It wasn’t Bruce Stephan’s incredibly tight first call.

In 1989, his car got dangerously stuck on the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge when the Loma Prieta earthquake struck and the upper deck collapsed as he was crossing.


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Apply what we learned from Iraq to Afghanistan https://capperi.net/apply-what-we-learned-from-iraq-to-afghanistan/ https://capperi.net/apply-what-we-learned-from-iraq-to-afghanistan/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 20:44:08 +0000 https://capperi.net/apply-what-we-learned-from-iraq-to-afghanistan/ Vice-Admiral Kevin Donegan Former Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet, 32-Nation Combined Maritime Forces and Director of PAHO at CENTCOM Vice Admiral Kevin Donegan, USN (retired), served as the Commander of the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet and the Commander of the Combined Maritime Forces of the 32 Nations in the Middle East. In these roles, he led […]]]>

Vice-Admiral Kevin Donegan Former Commander, U.S. 5th Fleet, 32-Nation Combined Maritime Forces and Director of PAHO at CENTCOM

Vice Admiral Kevin Donegan, USN (retired), served as the Commander of the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet and the Commander of the Combined Maritime Forces of the 32 Nations in the Middle East. In these roles, he led teams that planned and executed joint and combined combat, counterterrorism and counter-piracy operations at sea and in Iraq, Syria, Afghanistan and Yemen.

EXPERT POINT OF VIEW – In December 2011, I was in a small American compound near Baghdad discussing with the local leaders of one of our intelligence services options to mitigate the loss of technical and human intelligence as the American military forces were reduced to zero in Iraq. Late at night, after my full day meetings were over, I called my boss, General Jim Mattis, then Commander of US Central Command (CENTCOM). He had just attended another session with the leaders in Washington and his words still remain with me today: “Small, we gave our best military advice, but the president said very clearly “zero means zero. ‘ Simply put, General Mattis was saying that no matter what the intelligence services need, or what they want us to do or what we should be doing, our US military will go to zero in Iraq. The decision was made, “come back to Tampa.”

At the time, I was the director of operations for CENTCOM and our team was responsible for supporting the plan to reduce all US military forces from their peak of over 100,000 to zero at the end of December. On the orders of the President, General Lloyd Austin successfully carried out the complex operation of withdrawing American forces to zero before the end of the year, including withdrawing all our military equipment and systematically closing all our bases and before- posts.

As history has shown, this decision, while well executed, was wrong, but I am not going to blame it on a single presidential administration. This decision, like today’s in Afghanistan, was first negotiated by the previous administration and has been implemented by the current one. Having said that, there was a lot of criticism to be made, including for the Iraqi leadership who did not want to negotiate a status of forces agreement that was necessary to protect our soldiers. In the end, keeping American troops there would have been difficult, there would have been political fallout and we should have adjusted our schedule, but it shouldn’t have mattered. Our American leadership must always prioritize what is in our national interest, even when it is difficult; after all “we know how to do it hard”.

Now that we watch this debacle unfold in our exit from Afghanistan, what lessons learned from Iraq should we apply today and is there still time? There are lessons learned from Iraq that are applicable in Afghanistan because even though history does not repeat itself it certainly rhymes a lot and yes there is still time.

First, why is the American presence so important? This answer is simple, but it is not just a question of numbers, it is also a question of leadership and commitment of the United States. Media and military analysts often look at the number of troops or equipment because it’s an easy measure, but that number alone misses a key point: the influence of the United States. is much larger. Regardless of all the talk about growing competition from the great powers and the shift of the United States from a single world power to a more multipolar world, the leadership and influence of the United States will continue to be much broader. than the number of troops present. Our stated or implied commitment and presence continue to carry far greater weight than numbers and even greater impact if we do the hard work of leadership and build a grouping of other nations to join us. We don’t need to look any further than the past few weeks in Afghanistan to see this happen again.

The Taliban now control most of Afghanistan, including the capital; the only difference from a few months ago is that we pulled 3,500 American troops and the coalition of nations that supported what we were doing. These soldiers were not engaged in direct combat operations against the Taliban, they carried out a number of other missions, but they were also a symbol of the leadership and commitment of the United States. Despite the Afghan government’s history of corruption and the fact that over time our declared mission in Afghanistan has grown and wandered, ultimately our presence, these 3,500 troops, has helped keep the Taliban at bay. . This has allowed us to have a base from which to continue to gather intelligence and, most importantly, prevent the resurgence of al Qaeda or the rise of another global terrorist network.

What lesson should we learn from Iraq and apply to Afghanistan? In the vacuum of an Iraq without an American presence, the birth of the Islamic State was facilitated. We have all seen the results go to zero: the horrific acts of terrorism by ISIS, the killing of innocent people across Europe, their merciless killings and mutilations of those who do not agree with their beliefs, the induction of women into sexual slavery and the senseless destruction of artifacts. As a result, the United States, with the support of a coalition of over 60 nations, has had to return and spend a precious national treasure in lives and resources to hunt down and destroy ISIS in Iraq and Syria. Why? Lacking a small number of American forces on the ground. To put that into perspective, at the time in Iraq, we were proposing to keep about 5,000 troops in the field.

Where are we now in Afghanistan? We made some significant mistakes in our withdrawal, which I don’t need to go into in detail, and we had to send back troops before because we were working to hit numbers on a made-up timeline that had nothing to do with the conditions on. field.

What should we do now? We cannot go back and take Afghanistan back from the Taliban, but neither must we turn our backs on doing the right thing. The first step is obvious and ongoing: we must bring our citizens out wherever they are in the country, as well as those who have helped us in our mission. Doing less will not be forgotten in future conflicts when we need the help of local people or opposition groups.

We cannot wait until we have completed this mission to move on to the next steps. We also need to work now to find a way to have a presence in the Afghanistan / Pakistan region and we need to lead and influence in support of our national interests. It will also be very difficult – there are no alternative base options nearby and there is no ready-made coalition to lead – but we have options and they far outweigh the alternative. . If we do nothing, it will provide leeway for the next terrorist network to rise up, determined to attack the West. It is a certainty that will only be a matter of time.

What should our plan be? We have to work with other countries, starting with NATO countries and other allies. We did not involve them in this withdrawal decision or in this timeline, so it is time to admit our mistake and rebuild a coalition. We will have to start small because we have lost confidence, but it will grow once everyone sees that we are fully engaged.


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Understand that Pakistan will have to be part of the solution. Yes, it is difficult for the United States to work with Pakistan, but let us not forget that their nuclear weapons must remain controlled. It is in their interests and ours to prevent terrorist networks like al-Qaeda from reappearing in Afghanistan or Pakistan.

Other nations can and will help. At the height of the wave in Afghanistan, we sometimes lost our access to the main land and air supply line through Pakistan. We then used our American influence to build a northern supply distribution network from scratch using negotiated access to several other countries. A similar effort working with the same sense of urgency will now be needed to ensure that we have the presence we need in the Afghanistan / Pakistan region. Some of these adjacent countries are now under the influence of Russia, so that will also be hard work and will take time.

Continue to strengthen our alliances and partnerships in Qatar, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, so that these basic options remain or can be extended. We must also seek to work with Russia and China. There is common ground with each, but again, it will not be easy and will take time. The lesson we have learned is that the alternative of not taking these steps will be a much larger commitment of the national treasury and resources down the road.

In conclusion, the American presence counts and when combined with the leadership and commitment of the United States, it has a much greater strategic impact. This holds true even in the face of everything we see unfolding in the news today. We must now join our allies and other partners and guide them in applying the lessons we have learned from goal zero in Iraq; it is in our national interest to do so.

This article by Cipher Brief Expert Vice-Admiral Kevin Donegan (Retired) was first published by MEI


Go beyond the headlines with expert views on today’s news with The Cipher Brief’s daily open source podcast. Listen here or wherever you listen to podcasts.



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Macron says France will keep troops in Iraq to contain terrorism https://capperi.net/macron-says-france-will-keep-troops-in-iraq-to-contain-terrorism/ https://capperi.net/macron-says-france-will-keep-troops-in-iraq-to-contain-terrorism/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 18:05:23 +0000 https://capperi.net/macron-says-france-will-keep-troops-in-iraq-to-contain-terrorism/ Published on: 08/28/2021 – 20:05 Speaking at a regional summit in Iraq, French President Emmanuel Macron said his country would continue to deploy troops there to fight terrorism, even if the United States pulled out. The comments follow a deadly attack claimed by Islamic State in Afghanistan, a country that has come under Taliban control. […]]]>

Published on:

Speaking at a regional summit in Iraq, French President Emmanuel Macron said his country would continue to deploy troops there to fight terrorism, even if the United States pulled out. The comments follow a deadly attack claimed by Islamic State in Afghanistan, a country that has come under Taliban control.

“Given the geopolitical events, this conference has taken a special turn,” Macron said at the summit convened by Iraq as he seeks to play the role of regional mediator.

“No matter what choices the Americans make, we will maintain our presence in Iraq to fight terrorism,” Macron said at a press conference in Baghdad.

“We all know that we must not let our guard down, because Daesh (the Islamic State group) remains a threat, and I know that the fight against these terrorist groups is a priority of your government,” Macron told earlier in the outcome of a meeting with the Iraqis. Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhemi.

“Fighting terrorism, supporting structured regional projects and responding to Middle East challenges can only be done together,” Macron wrote on Twitter.

“The Baghdad conference is historic. It is already a success in itself, a new form of cooperation has been born.”


The French president considers Iraq as “essential” to stability in the Middle East.

“We refuse to allow Iraq to be used as a theater for regional or international conflicts,” Macron said.

France is currently providing military support to Iraq, including the air force, with 800 troops deployed as part of a US-led international coalition against Islamic State extremists.

In July, President Joe Biden said US combat operations in Iraq would end this year, but US soldiers would continue to train, advise and support the country’s military in the fight against ISIS.

Washington currently has 2,500 troops deployed in Iraq.

Key partners

Iraq and France are “key partners in the war on terrorism,” Kadhemi replied.

The meeting comes as Iraq, long a victim of jihadist activism, is also trying to establish itself as a mediator between the Arab countries and Iran.

Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi and Jordan’s King Abdullah II flew to the summit, which was also attended by foreign ministers of regional enemies Iran and Saudi Arabia.

Emir of Qatar Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani, Ruler of Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al-Maktoum, Kuwaiti Prime Minister Sheikh Sabah Al-Khalid Al-Sabah and Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu also attended participated.

French President Emmanuel Macron (third from left) poses with other leaders at a regional meeting in Baghdad, August 28, 2021 Ludovic MARIN PISCINE / AFP

Iraq, rich in oil, has been caught for years in a delicate balance between its two main allies, Iran and the United States.

Iran wields major influence in Iraq through armed groups allied within the Hached al-Chaabi, a powerful state-sponsored paramilitary network.

Baghdad has been negotiating since April between the American ally Riyadh and Tehran on repairing the links broken in 2016.

“It was really not easy to put the Saudis and the Iranians in the same room,” said a French diplomatic source.

But an adviser to Kadhemi said the mere presence of the two foreign ministers together was in itself a “success.”

The summit comes shortly after the subsidiary of the Islamic State (IS) group claimed responsibility for Thursday’s suicide bombing in Kabul which left dozens of people dead, including 13 US servicemen.

The explosion occurred in the last few days of US-led evacuations from Afghanistan after the Taliban takeover.

The attack has rekindled concerns that the extremist organization, which seized swathes of Syria and Iraq before being driven from both countries, is reappearing, analysts said.

Taliban talks

While in Baghdad, Macron had separate talks with the Emir of Qatar over a possible role for Doha, which has good contacts with the Taliban who have organized peace talks, in organizing further evacuations beyond. of the August 31 deadline set by Washington, sources close to the president said.

The French leader told reporters that Paris was in talks with the Taliban via Qatar to “protect and repatriate” Afghans in danger.

The evacuations are planned jointly with Qatar and could involve “airlift operations,” Macron said after the summit.

He added that France, which ended its evacuations from Afghanistan on Friday, had evacuated 2,834 people since August 17.

Macron is due to visit the Iraqi city of Mosul, the last stronghold of the IS organization before its fall in 2017, on Sunday, followed by Arbil, the capital of the northern Iraqi Kurdistan region.



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Why Sino-Taliban Cooperation Could Be Hindered By Uyghur Issue https://capperi.net/why-sino-taliban-cooperation-could-be-hindered-by-uyghur-issue/ https://capperi.net/why-sino-taliban-cooperation-could-be-hindered-by-uyghur-issue/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 09:57:25 +0000 https://capperi.net/why-sino-taliban-cooperation-could-be-hindered-by-uyghur-issue/ (August 25, 2021 / JNS) Many adversaries of the United States are taking the opportunity to fill the void created by the precipitous military withdrawal of the United States from Afghanistan. The People’s Republic of China (PRC) is not one of them. While Beijing will undoubtedly try to take advantage of Afghanistan’s vast reserves of […]]]>

Many adversaries of the United States are taking the opportunity to fill the void created by the precipitous military withdrawal of the United States from Afghanistan. The People’s Republic of China (PRC) is not one of them.

While Beijing will undoubtedly try to take advantage of Afghanistan’s vast reserves of mineral resources and celebrate America’s failure in the country, it will also need to consider its own security outlook as the Taliban projects terrorism. and radicalism in the region.

Beijing is guilty of committing atrocious human rights violations, under the guise of counterterrorism in its Xinjiang province, against the country’s Uyghur Muslims. The Taliban’s historic ties to a controversial Uyghur separatist group, the East Turkestan Islamic Movement (ETIM), worry Chinese leaders, who consider the group a terrorist organization.

Uyghurs are Turkish-speaking Muslims from the northwestern China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. Beijing sees this minority group as a threat to Han nationalism and fears calls for Uyghur separatism.

As part of its efforts to promote so-called cultural unity, the PRC perpetuates modern slavery in Xinjiang by forcibly detaining Uyghurs in makeshift concentration camps. Chinese officials have been accused of committing crimes against humanity for the torture and ill-treatment inflicted on this minority community. Uyghur women are systematically sexually abused, sterilized and indoctrinated. Uyghur men suffer the same fate in Xinjiang.

For years, Chinese officials have been shouting terrorism by referring to the Uyghur population and claiming that their efforts at detention, indoctrination and “re-education” are aimed at limiting the terrorist threat posed by the minority group. Beijing points the finger at ETIM to support the claim that Uyghur dissident groups, particularly in Xinjiang province, have committed and will continue to commit crimes against the ethnic Hans. However, the origins and even the current existence of the ETIM are disputed.

According to the Council on Foreign Relations, the term ETIM first appeared following a meeting in Afghanistan in 1999, when a Moscow-based newspaper reported that Osama bin Laden had pledged funds to both ETIM and the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan. China alleges that ETIM is closely linked to the Turkestan Islamic Party (TIP), a group that claimed responsibility for a handful of terrorist attacks against civilians in Beijing in 2008.

Although the link has not been confirmed, China claimed that “Osama bin Laden and the Taliban in Afghanistan provided the terrorist organizations in ‘East Turkestan’ with equipment and financial resources and trained their personnel,” and that one organization in particular, the “East Turkestan Islamic Movement” (ETIM), was a “major component of the terrorist network led by Osama bin Laden”.

Now that the Taliban has become the de facto government of Afghanistan, Chinese officials fear that Uyghur separatists will be encouraged and potentially helped to rise up against their oppressors.

Recent news reports suggest that Chinese and Taliban officials have reached an agreement not to meddle with each other and to establish diplomatic relations once a Taliban government is in place. During an Aug. 18 webinar on the Afghan crisis, Victoria Coates, senior analyst at the Center for Security Policy, said a new Taliban government could agree to work with China, accept aid and investment – and do not try to help the persecuted Uyghurs in China – because it will be “transactional” and corrupt.

On the other hand, the Taliban – an outright Islamist movement – may not agree to work with a nation that detains, tortures and indoctrinates its Muslim population. The Taliban might initially cooperate with the PRC to establish a working government to validate itself in the international community, but a long-term partnership may not be possible due to China’s brutal oppression against Uyghur Muslims.

Maya Carlin is an analyst at the Center for Security Policy in Washington DC and former Anna Sobol Levy Fellow at IDC Herzliya in Israel.


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What the collapse of the Afghan government means for Christians and other religious minorities – getreligion https://capperi.net/what-the-collapse-of-the-afghan-government-means-for-christians-and-other-religious-minorities-getreligion/ https://capperi.net/what-the-collapse-of-the-afghan-government-means-for-christians-and-other-religious-minorities-getreligion/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://capperi.net/what-the-collapse-of-the-afghan-government-means-for-christians-and-other-religious-minorities-getreligion/ On October 19, 2001, as I was driving to a prayer breakfast in the Oklahoma City suburb of Edmond, the radio crackled with news of US special forces on the ground in Afghanistan. This was not a particularly shocking development since the airstrikes and missiles in retaliation for 9/11 had started 12 days earlier. Then […]]]>

On October 19, 2001, as I was driving to a prayer breakfast in the Oklahoma City suburb of Edmond, the radio crackled with news of US special forces on the ground in Afghanistan.

This was not a particularly shocking development since the airstrikes and missiles in retaliation for 9/11 had started 12 days earlier.

Then religion editor for Oklahoman, I quoted the breakfast keynote speaker – Steve Largent, then Congressman Professional Football Hall of Fame – in the story I wrote.

“We received a very important wake-up call,” Largent said on Friday morning. “Let’s not go back to sleep.”

All of us – at that time – felt an urgency about the war in Afghanistan and the effort to destroy Osama bin Laden’s terrorist network.

Almost 20 years later, my attention had shifted until Afghanistan hit the headlines again – in a major way – last week.

It’s impossible to keep up with all the rapid developments, but these stories explore compelling religious angles:

• Young Afghans share their thoughts on the rapidly changing life under the Taliban (by Meagan Clark, ReligionUnplugged)

• Refugee aid groups criticize Biden for tripping over evacuation of ‘desperate’ Afghans (by Emily McFarlan Miller and Jack Jenkins, Religious Information Service)

• The Taliban begins to target Christians while strengthening their control over desperate Afghans (by Mindy Belz, World)

• Afghan-American scholar agonizes over his homeland, attacks the Taliban, in the United States (by Mark A. Kellner, Washington Time)

Small numbers of Christians in Afghanistan have gone underground, expert says (by Mark A. Kellner, Washington Time)

Was Afghanistan worth it or was it wasted? Christians Lament, Pray, and Learn as Taliban Take Back Control (by Morgan Lee, Christianity today)

• As the Afghan government collapses, Christians work to help volunteers leave (by Cheryl Mann Bacon, Christian Chronicle)

• The Afghan government collapses, the Taliban take control: 5 essential readings (by Catesby Holmes, The conversation)

With the Taliban takeover, global Islam – and the press – have a lot at stake in the future (by Richard Ostling, Get religion)

Trying to spot religious “ghosts” in the dramatic fall of America’s version of Afghanistan and a new podcast, “When the Taliban Suppress, Will All the Victims Be Worth Covering in the News?” (by Terry Mattingly, Get religion)

• What Christian aid workers want you to know about Afghanistan (by Rebecca Hopkins, Christianity today)

Waiting for monday ReligionUnplugged podcast: Fernando Arroyo, Minister of Veterans Affairs in California, talks about his painful time as a paratrooper in Iraq and Afghanistan – and how his faith and guidance helped him overcome the depression, loneliness and PTSD that left him haunted after its deployment.

Now Arroyo is helping California veterans get out of homelessness and move on with their lives. You’ll definitely want to check out his conversation with Paul Glader, ReligionUnplugged’s editor-in-chief.


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How does expansionism join terrorism? https://capperi.net/how-does-expansionism-join-terrorism/ https://capperi.net/how-does-expansionism-join-terrorism/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 18:31:04 +0000 https://capperi.net/how-does-expansionism-join-terrorism/ The story of how the United States, India and Afghanistan were completely left out and the fulcrum shifted to China and its allies – Russia, Pakistan and the Iran The Taliban takeover is the first step towards establishing an alternative world order devoid of any international law. As the United States emerges from its “eternal […]]]>

The story of how the United States, India and Afghanistan were completely left out and the fulcrum shifted to China and its allies – Russia, Pakistan and the Iran

The Taliban takeover is the first step towards establishing an alternative world order devoid of any international law. As the United States emerges from its “eternal war” phase, many are still puzzled as to how the Taliban has managed to become a significant “stakeholder” in the region. Today Pakistan will be the first country to recognize the reign of terror. It will soon be followed by China and other powers hostile to the West. Expansionism thus joined terrorism. It is possible that when the West focused on the talks, the Taliban used the platform of talks to gain political recognition. He was simultaneously rearmed by others. Take a few steps back and the contours of the tangled geopolitics emerge.

The Taliban’s quest for diplomatic and political recognition dates back to 2007 when they established a political commission to reach out to the world, especially the United States. The fundamental objective that the Taliban had in mind was to project itself as a “political movement” instead of a terrorist organization. Later, the opening of their first overseas office in Doha in 2013 gave them de facto recognition as it was visited by diplomats from different countries. Talks were unsuccessful and the office was closed. However, it has allowed the Taliban to have a “diplomatic” voice for themselves and the much-needed political space. for “zero tolerance” against terrorism.

In early 2014-15, the great powers and the Taliban converged to end ISIS. The Iranian government has allowed the Taliban to open their office in Mashhad. This convergence also led to the 2015 US-Iran nuclear deal. The United States, via Iran, indirectly engaged with the Taliban to fight ISIS. Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani played an important role in helping the United States fight ISIS. Somehow, the United States has “outsourced” the struggle, a development that was covered by The Washington Post.

Russian interests also coincided against ISIS. This has motivated powers like Russia and China to engage the Taliban and treat them as an important stakeholder. Dealing with regional and extra-regional powers through roundabouts has been a moment of tactical and strategic victory for the Taliban. It is also the time when the rearmament of the Taliban was initiated by Iran and Russia. For example, Tehran’s military aid to the Taliban included small arms, grenades propelled by rifles, and even military training. Pakistan’s military support for the Taliban is already well established. Joint resistance against Daesh thus paved the way for the Taliban. Two Taliban goals have been achieved. First, an overview of the stakeholder club, and second, how it regained a stronghold in Afghanistan which then gave wings to its old aspirations to form an Islamic emirate.

China launched its OBOR in 2013 and expanded its economic presence to South, Central and West Asia, excluding Africa. It has also made tactical forays into the region through its supplies of small arms and by supporting undemocratic and tyrannical governments in all these regions. China thus adopted a policy of “shadow boxer” in which it vaguely cooperated with countries hostile to the United States in their sub-regions. It has also strengthened its strategic, military and economic relations with Russia as well as with Pakistan. Iran’s profitability for both Russia and China is therefore well founded. The strong polarizations became evident in 2016 at the Sixth Heart of Asia (HoA) Conference held in Amritsar. India and Afghanistan, despite attempts to highlight Pakistan’s role in the terrorist network, were brutally sidelined when Islamabad received diplomatic appreciation from Russia.

Simultaneously, the Sino-Pakistani link has supported armed insurgencies in Afghanistan through the Haqqani and Hekmatyar networks while offering their good offices to negotiate an agreement between Kabul and the Taliban. Such a deal at that precise moment meant initiating some sort of legitimacy for the Taliban. The Afghan peace process was fertile ground for sowing the seeds of China-Russia-Pakistan and Iran cooperation. The first meeting of the Quadrilateral Coordination Group (QCG) on the Afghan Peace and Reconciliation Process was held in Islamabad in January 2016. Through this platform, Pakistan succeeded in bringing the United States and China at the same table. This ensured that any decision that was taken would be in favor of Pakistan; and the projection of its strategic utility to the United States, Russia and other European powers would be a bonus.

As Beijing continued to influence Moscow, new tripartite talks between China, Pakistan and Russia first took place in December 2016, in which Moscow decided to work on a “working group on” Afghanistan ”. India and Afghanistan have been left behind again in this geopolitics. He paved the way for an emerging Pakistan-China-Russia alliance. Over time, as fundamentalists from Syria and Iraq moved towards Afghanistan, Moscow and Beijing further strengthened their cooperation with the Taliban. It also downplayed the US-led mission in Afghanistan. For these reasons, the Haqqani network and its agents have played an important role.

When India and Afghanistan voiced concerns, the talks converted to six-party talks in 2017, but the two had little influence. obliged to recognize it as a political party. India despite its differences with Afghanistan on the issue has continued its humanitarian support and development projects.

By then, a Sino-Russian understanding had taken shape and the United States withdrew from the JCPOA in May 2018. Iran had encouraged relations between Russia and the Taliban. In addition, ex-Taliban dissidents who joined ISIS posed a common threat in Moscow and Tehran. This resulted in the complete exclusion of the United States, India and Afghanistan and the shift of the pivot to China and its allies – Russia, Pakistan and Iran. The Taliban were then recognized as an important stakeholder and had started to negotiate on issues such as terrorism, drug trafficking and women’s rights projecting their “sovereign” demands on Afghanistan. They went so far as to declare the non-recognition of the Afghan delegation. In addition, Iran has adopted OBOR, and the geostrategic landscape of South Asia and Central Asia has changed completely. Expansionism had thus joined terrorism.

After completing the encirclement, the United States entered into a “peace agreement” with the Taliban, of course, with certain obligations on the part of the latter such as peaceful return, the safety of women and children, and so on. Departure 2021. The environment has become too hostile for the United States and has therefore resulted in an early exit. In all of these circumstances, there are no complete wins or losses. China is preparing to be trapped by a creditor in Pakistan and Afghanistan. For India, too, the challenges are immense and India has shown its character by doing everything it can do for humanitarian reasons – from building parliament and libraries to dams and granting scholarships for Afghan students.

(The author is an assistant professor at the Central University of the Punjab, Bathinda. The opinions expressed are personal.)


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“All Afghans” should feel safe under the Taliban, says security chief | Taliban news https://capperi.net/all-afghans-should-feel-safe-under-the-taliban-says-security-chief-taliban-news/ https://capperi.net/all-afghans-should-feel-safe-under-the-taliban-says-security-chief-taliban-news/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 16:11:47 +0000 https://capperi.net/all-afghans-should-feel-safe-under-the-taliban-says-security-chief-taliban-news/ Kabul, Afghanistan – Khalil Ur-Rahman Haqqani, a Taliban figure currently in charge of security in Kabul, echoed the group’s claims that “all Afghans” should feel safe in their Islamic emirate, and that a “general amnesty” has been granted in all 34 countries of the country. provinces. Speaking to Al Jazeera on Sunday, Haqqani, whose associates […]]]>

Kabul, Afghanistan – Khalil Ur-Rahman Haqqani, a Taliban figure currently in charge of security in Kabul, echoed the group’s claims that “all Afghans” should feel safe in their Islamic emirate, and that a “general amnesty” has been granted in all 34 countries of the country. provinces.

Speaking to Al Jazeera on Sunday, Haqqani, whose associates also play a leading role in establishing security in the capital, said the Taliban was working to restore order and security in a country which has seen more than four decades of war.

“If we can defeat the superpowers, we can certainly ensure the safety of the Afghan people,” said Haqqani, who is also a veteran of the Afghan-Soviet war.

Many Afghans are skeptical that a leader of the Haqqani network, known to be the most brutal and violent group associated with the Taliban, will bring security to Afghanistan after 40 years of war and violence – especially because of reports of house-to-house searches and violence allegedly committed by the Taliban continue to flow, including in Kabul.

Haqqani is still labeled a “global terrorist” by the United States, with a $ 5 million bounty issued to him by the US Treasury Department in February 2011, and he remains on a United Nations terrorist list.

Haqqani’s statement also comes as thousands continue to try to enter Kabul’s Hamid Karzai International Airport, where the Taliban, intelligence forces and US soldiers actively try to stop the desperately trying crowds. to flee the country to enter the premises.

Since crowds first gathered near the airport last Sunday, there have been almost daily reports of violence, injuries, pushes and deaths.

Still, Haqqani insisted that people shouldn’t be afraid of the Taliban.

“Our hostility was with the occupation. There was a superpower that came from outside to divide us. They forced a war on us. We have no hostility towards anyone, we are all Afghans, ”he said.

Haqqani’s reference to a “forced” war refers to a similar term often used by the government of former President Ashraf Ghani. This government has repeatedly called the Afghan conflict an “imposed war”.

However, the two sides differ as to who they believe brought the war to Afghanistan. For the Taliban and Haqqani, it was the United States and their coalition of 40 nations, while Ghani and his administration have often blamed neighboring Pakistan for the violence and discord in their nation by facilitating the Taliban and other armed groups – which Islamabad denies.

Now that foreign forces are within 10 days of a full withdrawal, Haqqani and the Taliban say they see no enemies on Afghan soil and instead want to work with as many people as possible to restore order to the region. nation.

Part of Khalil Ur-Rahman Haqqani’s security details – Haqqani is still labeled a global terrorist by the United States and also remains on a UN terrorist list [Ali M Latifi/Al Jazeera]

Taliban leaders have sought to show a more moderate face since the capture of Kabul last Sunday and have started talks on forming a government.

Haqqani cites recent meetings with former President Karzai, as well as with Abdullah Abdullah, a member of the resistance against the initial Taliban regime in the 1990s, and Gul Agha Sherzai, the former Minister of Borders and Tribal Affairs as proof that the group is ready to embrace all Afghans.

“Karzai was in conflict with us for 13 years, but in the end we even assured him of his safety,” Haqqani said, referring to the years Karzai spent as head of the Western-backed Afghan government, which the Taliban have often referred to. as a “puppet” or “companion” administration.

In another sign that the group is signaling a willingness to abandon past feuds, on Sunday the Taliban allowed Karzai and Abdullah to negotiate with Ahmad Massoud, son of Tajik Mujahideen commander Ahmad Shah Massoud.

In the 1990s, the elder Massoud organized the only armed resistance to the Taliban’s strict five-year rule. There is concern that if young Massoud’s movement, which is called “Resistance 2.0” online, fails to come to an agreement with the Taliban, it could push Afghanistan back into another civil war.

To further prove his view that the Taliban are keeping their amnesty promises, Haqqani told Al Jazeera the story of his last interactions with the former national security adviser to Ghani’s government, Hamdullah Mohib.

“I was talking to Mohib, I told him not to go, that he and President Ghani would be safe. I said ‘We will ensure your safety,’ ”Haqqani said of the British national who allegedly fled with the former president.

In statements posted to his Facebook, Ghani said he fled to avoid bloodshed and to save his life, saying his security warned him of a credible threat to kill him if he stayed. in the country.

Haqqani denies this claim.

“All these people who have left this country, we will assure them of their safety. You are all welcome in Afghanistan, ”he said.

But for millions of Afghans, the words of Haqqani and Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid are not enough to see them return to the streets of Kabul. Across the capital, giant supermarkets remain closed, shops experience minimal foot traffic, and popular restaurants, cafes and shisha bars are struggling to make ends meet with only a fraction of their old clientele.

Patricia Gossman, deputy director for Asia at Human Rights Watch, says that too often references to security and order can pave the way for a police state.

“Public order is not the same as the rule of law. What we need to see is whether they will address concerns about house searches of journalists and activists, and responsibility for the killings of former government officials and media workers, ”Gossman told Al Jazeera. .

Meanwhile, Haqqani said the Taliban are working hard to try to stop other Afghans from fleeing, but the circulation of what he says are unfounded reports of abuse and violence make things much worse. difficult.

He says “the whole world” is trying to “fool” the Afghan people by claiming that the Taliban will eventually revert to the strict and brutal rule of the 1990s, which he vehemently denies.

This is, he said, the reason people go to the airport, “where they are treated shamefully.”

He says educated people who flee should work to serve their country rather than going to the airport, where they will face violence, humiliation and “shame”.

“We cannot build Afghanistan from the outside,” he told those who are waiting to leave or who have already left.

He also referred to the past 20 years of foreign intervention in which foreigners and Afghans have come from abroad to work in the country.

“Foreigners cannot build the nation for us. All they did was destroy it.


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Donald Kagan, great neo-conservative historian, died at 89 https://capperi.net/donald-kagan-great-neo-conservative-historian-died-at-89/ https://capperi.net/donald-kagan-great-neo-conservative-historian-died-at-89/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 14:31:41 +0000 https://capperi.net/donald-kagan-great-neo-conservative-historian-died-at-89/ NEW YORK (AP) – Prominent classical scholar, controversial advocate of mainstream education and architect of neo-conservative foreign policy, Donald Kagan has died aged 89. Kagan, professor emeritus at Yale University and father of historians Robert and Frederick Kagan, died on August 6 in a retirement home in Washington, DC. His death was announced by Yale […]]]>

NEW YORK (AP) – Prominent classical scholar, controversial advocate of mainstream education and architect of neo-conservative foreign policy, Donald Kagan has died aged 89.

Kagan, professor emeritus at Yale University and father of historians Robert and Frederick Kagan, died on August 6 in a retirement home in Washington, DC. His death was announced by Yale and confirmed by his sons on Wednesday.

Donald Kagan was a native of Lithuania, raised in New York, who studied Ancient Greece at university and was inspired by “the remarkable assumption that humans are not trivial.” Seeing himself as Greek in his very soul, he wrote several books on the rise and fall of the Golden Age of Athens, including an acclaimed and popular four-volume series on the devastating Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta and their respective allies. .

“A study of the Peloponnesian War is a source of wisdom on the behavior of human beings under the enormous pressures imposed by the hot plague and civil unrest,” he wrote in 2003, “and the limits within which it must inevitably operate. . “

Kagan developed his belief that the Peloponnesian conflict contained vital contemporary lessons in “On the Origins of War and the Preservation of Peace,” which came out in 1995. With a narrative spanning from ancient Greece and Rome to both World Wars of the 20th century and the Cold War that followed, he determined that some of the most horrific carnage could have been avoided had political leaders confronted the aggressors early on. He noted the reluctance of the Allies to confront Germany before WWI and WWII. He blamed the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis in part on Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev’s perception that President John F. Kennedy was afraid to use military force.

“The Cuban Missile Crisis demonstrated that it is not enough for a state that wishes to maintain peace and the status quo to have superior power,” Kagan wrote. “The crisis because the most powerful state also had a leader who failed to convince his opponent of his willingness to use his power for this purpose.”

Through his books, speeches, and media commentary, Kagan has become a leading conservative voice in the otherwise liberal realm of history, supporting military action abroad and membership in the Western canon. his home. He supported the wars in Vietnam and Iraq and questioned the patriotism of the protesters. He disdained multicultural programs and urged in vain to establish a special course in Western civilization at Yale. He enraged his colleagues when, as dean of Yale College, he told new freshmen in 1990 that the inability to focus on the West was “at the risk of our students, our country, and our people. hopes of a democratic and liberal society emerging around the world today. ”

“Don should remain a Tory MP,” Peter Brooks, chairman of Yale’s comparative literature department, later told the Washington Post. “He’s better as a gadfly, not as a dean.”

In 1997, Kagan joined Dick Cheney, Donald Rumsfeld and other future officials of the George W. Bush administration in endorsing the neo-conservative project for a new American century and its mission statement calling for “politics. Reaganite of military strength and moral clarity ”. Donald and his son Frederick Kagan collaborated in 2000 on “While America Sleeps: Self-Delusion, Military Weakness, and the Threat to Peace Today”, which received increased attention after the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

President Bush awarded Donald Kagan a National Humanities Medal in 2002 for his “eminent discipline on the glories of ancient Greece” and for teaching generations “the vital legacy of classical civilization”.

Born in Kurenai, Lithuania, Kagan was just 2 years old when he and his newly widowed mother immigrated to the United States and settled in New York’s Brooklyn neighborhood, where, as a child, his suspicious view of the humanity was shaped by the anti-Semitic gangs that threatened it. He was a student at Brooklyn College, earned a master’s degree in classical studies from Brown University, and a doctorate in history from Ohio State University.

Like neo-conservative brethren like Irving Kristol and Norman Podhoretz, he was a Democrat in his youth who turned right in response to the cultural and political upheavals of the 1960s. While teaching at Cornell University, he was furious the school’s agreement in 1969 to launch a black studies program after armed protesters occupied a campus building. He likened the decision to British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain’s appeasement of the Nazis in the 1930s and quickly left for Yale.

Thucydides was his model historian and Kagan shared the dark views of the ancient Greek scholar on human nature, how power among the nations triumphed over morality. Kagan liked to invoke Thucydides’ conclusion that wars were fought by a combination of fear, self-interest, and honor.

“I believed that peace was the normal situation for mankind, but the more I looked the more I saw that peace was very rare,” Kagan told Yale Alumni Magazine in 2002. “Wars happen all the time, so I had to ask, ‘Why is there never peace?’ “

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BJP Sarpanch security guard killed suspended https://capperi.net/bjp-sarpanch-security-guard-killed-suspended/ https://capperi.net/bjp-sarpanch-security-guard-killed-suspended/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 17:03:00 +0000 https://capperi.net/bjp-sarpanch-security-guard-killed-suspended/ Srinagar (Jammu and Kashmir) [India], Aug 9 (ANI): Sarpanch Personal Security Officer (PSO) Gulam Rasool Dar who was killed in the terrorist attack has been suspended for his absence at the time of the incident. Jammu and Kashmir Police, in a press release, said terrorists broke into Dar’s rented accommodation in Lalchowk, Anantnag, and fired […]]]>

Srinagar (Jammu and Kashmir) [India], Aug 9 (ANI): Sarpanch Personal Security Officer (PSO) Gulam Rasool Dar who was killed in the terrorist attack has been suspended for his absence at the time of the incident.

Jammu and Kashmir Police, in a press release, said terrorists broke into Dar’s rented accommodation in Lalchowk, Anantnag, and fired indiscriminately. The PSO provided to Dar was found absent from duty at the time of the incident and has been suspended, police said.

Police informed that two bicycle terrorists from the LeT Group were involved in this barbaric terrorist incident.

In this terrorist crime incident, BJP Sarpanch and his wife, Jawhara Begum were seriously injured by gunshot wounds and were pronounced dead in hospital.

“Although the deceased was granted secure accommodation at the Snow cap hotel, Kulgam and the two stayed there for a short time, but they constantly insisted on staying in their home in Anantnag Town and also submitted a pledge to this. At their request, they were allowed to stay in said house in Anantnag, “the statement said.

A case falling under the relevant articles of the law has been registered and an investigation is ongoing.

Police also informed that the area has been cordoned off and a search is also underway. (ANI)


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