Terrorist network – Capperi http://capperi.net/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 08:56:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://capperi.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-01T215521.666-150x150.png Terrorist network – Capperi http://capperi.net/ 32 32 Hurriyat played a key role in pushing Kashmiri students into medical schools in Pak: J&K Police https://capperi.net/hurriyat-played-a-key-role-in-pushing-kashmiri-students-into-medical-schools-in-pak-jk-police/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 08:48:54 +0000 https://capperi.net/hurriyat-played-a-key-role-in-pushing-kashmiri-students-into-medical-schools-in-pak-jk-police/ By Ahmed Ali Fayyaz New Delhi, January 5: In the indictment filed against the nine accused, Jammu and Kashmir police claimed that Kashmiri students, whose MBBS admission to Pakistani colleges was run by separatists for several years afterwards 1990, used to take the National Talent Search (NTS) test at the Hurriyat office in Pakistan. Counter […]]]>

By Ahmed Ali Fayyaz

New Delhi, January 5: In the indictment filed against the nine accused, Jammu and Kashmir police claimed that Kashmiri students, whose MBBS admission to Pakistani colleges was run by separatists for several years afterwards 1990, used to take the National Talent Search (NTS) test at the Hurriyat office in Pakistan.

Counter Intelligence Kashmir (CIK) – a cross-border intelligence arm of the Jammu and Kashmir police that was recently turned into a branch of the State Investigation Agency (SIA) – made sensational revelations in its indictment . The 22-page indictment was filed on Thursday, December 30, 2021 in the court of the Special Judge for NIA (National Investigation Agency) cases in Srinagar.

The CIK had filed the FIR file n °: 05/2020 dated 27-07-2020 under articles 13, 17, 18 and 40 of the law on illegal activities (prevention) and article 420 of the Penal Code Indian after receiving reports that a separatist-controlled network had organized the admission of hundreds of Kashmiri students to various colleges in Pakistan for several years. He had received reports that part of the money generated by illegal means was spent on terrorist and subversive activities across Jammu and Kashmir. Subsequently, a section on money laundering was also added to the same FIR.

After 13 months of investigation, in August 2021, the CIK claimed responsibility for the arrest of six people while claiming that some of the defendants were based and operating from Pakistan. Militant leader turned separatist Mohammad Akbar Bhat aka Zaffar Akbar Bhat, his Pakistan-based brother Altaf Bhat, Mohammad Abdullah Shah of Kupwara and his Pakistan-based brother Manzoor Ahmad Shah, Srinagar-based woman Fatima Shah and Qazi Yasir from Anantnag are the key defendants in the CIK indictment.

After serving as Hizbul Mujahideen’s “District Commander” for Budgam and “Division Commander” for Central Kashmir for over three years, Zaffar Akbar Bhat became an associate of Abdul Majeed Dar of Sopore. During his attempts to overthrow Syed Salahuddin and take over as “supreme commander” of Hizbul Mujahideen, Dar was gunned down by militants from his organization at his home in Sopore in March 2003. All dissidents of Hizbul Mujahideen and Dar’s devotees, with the exception of Zaffar, were eliminated one after the other.

While Dar’s confidant, Masood Tantray, aka ‘Commander Masood’, was killed in a police operation in Pampore, Zaffar’s brother and estate agent Abdul Gani Bhat was killed, allegedly by Hizbul Mujahideen activists . Thereupon Zaffar maintained good relations with the militant organization through the senior separatist leader Syed Ali Shah Geelani and he was spared. On the other hand, J&K police not only left him free to continue his separatist political activities under the banner of the “Salvation Movement”, but also provided him with security blanket from four armed agents.

Zaffar played a key role in the violent protests and clashes of 2008 and 2010 against police and security forces. In August 2021, he was arrested for handling MBBS admissions for Kashmiri students in Pakistan and pumping part of the proceeds into activism and separatism. According to the CIK indictment, he led the admissions gang through his brother Altaf Bhat who moved to Pakistan to become an activist in 1990.

Detained in the same case, Qazi Yasir happens to be the successor son of the assassinated separatist leader and an influential cleric Qazi Nisar who was allegedly shot dead by Hizbul Mujahideen militants in June 1994. Founder of Ummat-e-Islami Qazi Nisar was instrumental in launching the Jamaat-e-Islami-dominated Muslim United Front (MUF) and in leading his campaign in the 1987 legislative elections.

The CIK indictment sheet illustrates how a well-organized network of separatists and activists, with the support of the Pakistani establishment, including the high commission in New Delhi, roped up aspiring MBBS in the Kashmir Valley and arranged their admission to different vocational colleges in Pakistan. for huge sums of money. The high commission, he claims, was issuing valid travel documents to beneficiaries on the written recommendations of some Hurriyat leaders.

“Students were forced to take the National Talent Search (NTS) test at the Hurriyat Pakistan office as a trick to trick them into believing they were writing a prequalification test that would lead to their admission to colleges. professionals in Pakistan, “reads the indictment sheet viewed by India Narrative. Usually, these tests are offered free or for a nominal fee to international students as part of the technical assistance program.

Career Park Educational Consultancy Trust and Andrabi Consultancy, based in Srinagar, managed by Syed Khlaid Geelani, would have been responsible for selecting the applicants and facilitating their passage to Pakistan.

“During the investigation, it emerged that the accused persons affiliated with the Hurriyat Chapter of Kashmir and Pakistan in a planned plot were illegally accumulating money under the pretext of being admitted to MBBS courses. While recording the statements, it appeared that the accumulated money had been invested in activism and creating public order problems by disturbing the peace, damaging public property, sowing terror among the masses and creating a potential threat to Indian sovereignty, ”the CIK indictment sheet stated.

“The money collected through this process was also distributed to the families of the terrorists killed as an incentive for those families and families of active militants to boost their morale and carry out anti-national, subversive and radical activities against the Union of India, “he added. Part of the money collected from the parents of aspiring MBBS was distributed to minions during the turmoil throughout the valley following the murder of Hizbul Mujahideen poster Burhan Wani during a meeting in 2016.

The indictment traced the money between various characters in the network, including Mohammad Abdullah Shah, his Rawalpindi-based brother and Hurriyat (Geelani) activist Manzoor Ahmad Shah and his Lahore-based brother Mohammad Sayeed Shah. , President of Zaffar Bhat’s Al-Jabbar Trust, Fatima Shah, Zaffar and his Pakistan-based brother Altaf Bhat.

Fatima Shah, according to the indictment, has visited Pakistan several times. His photographs with Hizbul Mujahideen leader Syed Salahuddin were recovered from his residence in Srinagar. Her sister is married to a Kashmiri activist in Pakistan.

The motive for all the activity, according to the CIK indictment sheet, was “to keep some of the terror boiling and to breathe a new spirit into the bosom of terror.”

The last group of beneficiary students, who had returned to Kashmir due to the Covid pandemic in 2020, were not allowed by the Indian government to return and continue their MBBS studies in Pakistan. Hundreds of beneficiaries have already completed their MBBS in Pakistan and have secured regular jobs in the J&K government. However, the CIK did not present them as accused in the FIR.


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Delhi HC issues notice on NIA plea challenging refusal to extend police custody for three defendants https://capperi.net/delhi-hc-issues-notice-on-nia-plea-challenging-refusal-to-extend-police-custody-for-three-defendants/ Mon, 03 Jan 2022 08:18:24 +0000 https://capperi.net/delhi-hc-issues-notice-on-nia-plea-challenging-refusal-to-extend-police-custody-for-three-defendants/ The Delhi High Court on Monday released a plea notice filed by the National Investigation Agency (NIA) challenging a trial court order that dismissed his request to extend the custody of three people accused in connection with the terrorist financing case in Jammu and Kashmir. Judge Rajnish Bhatnagar requested the response from the three defendants, […]]]>

The Delhi High Court on Monday released a plea notice filed by the National Investigation Agency (NIA) challenging a trial court order that dismissed his request to extend the custody of three people accused in connection with the terrorist financing case in Jammu and Kashmir.

Judge Rajnish Bhatnagar requested the response from the three defendants, namely Owais Ahmad Dar, Arif Farooq Bhat and Kamran Ashraf Reshi, while releasing the case for a new hearing on February 2.

A case was registered by the NIA, in accordance with an order of 10.10.2021 issued by the Ministry of the Interior, under art. IPC 120B, 121A, 122 & 123 and sec. 18, 18A, 18B, 20, 38 & 39 of UAPA, 1967.

During the investigation, the names of 13 accused persons were revealed who were allegedly linked to various terrorist groups like Lashkar-e-Toiba (LeT), Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM), Hizb-Ul-Mujahideen (HM ), Al Badar and other similar groups and their affiliates, thus suggesting that they were allegedly involved in radicalizing, recruiting and providing logistical support to escalate terrorist activities across the country.

Subsequently, searches were carried out by the NIA in which certain prosecution documents were recovered and seized which, according to the agency, revealed at first sight that the defendants were well connected to the network of terrorist organizations and provided a material and logistical support to terrorists who were allegedly committed to terrorizing Indian citizens by targeted killing of minorities living in the Kashmir valley. Subsequently, 25 people were arrested in October, November and December of last year.

While Dar and Bhat were in custody from October 16 to 28, 2021, Reshi was in custody from October 22 to October 27, 2021.

In an order dated November 27, 2021, the special judge of the NIA of the court of Patiala rejected the plea of ​​the NIA requesting the extension of the custody of the three defendants on the ground under the second provision of the article. 43D (2) (b) of the UAPA, they had already been remanded in custody and 30 days from the first detention had expired.

The judge ruled that the defendants could not be taken into police custody because they had already benefited from it within the first 30 days.

It is however the case of the NIA that custody with regard to each of the accused was granted for a period less than the maximum period of 30 days authorized by the UAPA.

“It is further argued that the interpretation as adopted by the Single Judge would render the second provision of Article 43D (2) (b) redundant and unnecessary and hamper a full and fair investigation of terrorist offenses, including the planning and commissioning is extremely complex in nature, made up of many intricate details, hatched with the cooperation, assistance and assistance of many people, and whose range and outline are vast and extensive, “ the plea reads.

It was further found that the data from the electronic devices of the accused persons had not been received in time from CERT-In and CFSL, so that it was not possible to compare them with all the relevant evidence. within the first 30 days, especially when the case involved large and complex international conspiracies.

The NIA therefore declared that the reasoning adopted by the trial judge was contrary to s. 43D (2) (b) of the UAPA which places no restriction on the power of the investigating agency to request police custody and the only hindrance imposed by the provision is that the total period for which an accused is placed in police custody may not exceed 30 days.

“The interpretation of Article 43D (2) (b) by the special judge is clearly contrary to his legislative intention, will have serious repercussions on the investigation of terrorism-related offenses and should therefore be rescinded”, the plea reads.

Consequently, the plea seeks the annulment of the contested order made by the court of first instance.

Case title: Nation Investigation Agency v. Owais Ahmed Dar & Ors.


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The intensified challenge of terrorism in 2022 https://capperi.net/the-intensified-challenge-of-terrorism-in-2022/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 07:25:12 +0000 https://capperi.net/the-intensified-challenge-of-terrorism-in-2022/ By Sankalp Gurjar New Delhi, January 1: The return of the Taliban to Kabul was the most important strategic development of 2021. It highlighted the growing threat of terrorism. For India, this signaled the deteriorating security environment in the region. Even more worrying, the victory of the Taliban and the exit of American forces opened […]]]>

By Sankalp Gurjar

New Delhi, January 1: The return of the Taliban to Kabul was the most important strategic development of 2021. It highlighted the growing threat of terrorism. For India, this signaled the deteriorating security environment in the region.

Even more worrying, the victory of the Taliban and the exit of American forces opened the possibility of once again transforming the Af-Pak region into a global epicenter of terror.

In Afghanistan, the power of the Islamic State of Khorasan (IS-KP) province is growing. The IS-KP is more radical compared to the Taliban in its ideological orientation and accuses the Taliban of having abandoned the path of Jihad.

Regular cases of terrorist attacks underscore the Taliban’s inability to contain the IS-KP and ensure law and order across the country. The IS-KP, like Al-Qaeda, is part of the global jihadist network and, as a result, the battle that rages between the Taliban and the IS-KP is taking on international dimensions.

Competition and rivalry between terrorist groups could lead to their attention being channeled to expend energy in their internal and factional battles. However, such an event could prompt terrorist organizations to launch more spectacular and devastating attacks to attract new recruits.

Besides the IS-KP, the presence of Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) further increases the challenge of terrorism emanating from the Af-Pak region. The Taliban’s positions on the presence of Al-Qaeda, LeT and Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) remain ambiguous at best and favorable at worst.

The challenge is further compounded by Pakistan-based terrorist groups and their complicated relationship with the Pakistani Deep State. The Taliban’s return to Kabul has emboldened other terrorist groups in the region such as Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP). The TTP signed a month-long ceasefire with Pakistani authorities in November. The ceasefire ended in December and the TTP appears to be preparing to launch further attacks in Pakistan.

The deep state of Pakistan has pledged to support the Taliban in Afghanistan and terrorist groups focused on India. However, he is opposed to the TTP and does not wish to see the IS-KP develop in the areas bordering the Af-Pak border. Squaring this circle is a challenge and will lead to a further deterioration of Pakistan’s internal security scenario.

China, although one of the key players in the geopolitical evolution of Afghanistan, will be concerned about developments in the Af-Pak region. The security of the China-Pakistan economic corridor and the spillover of radical Islam into restless Xinjiang are top interests of China.

China’s engagement with the Taliban aims in part to allay these concerns. Pakistan will remain a key interlocutor for China in Afghanistan. The China-Pak bond and their ties to the Taliban complicate India’s challenges in Afghanistan.

From westernmost Afghanistan to Pakistan-occupied Kashmir, a terrorist corridor is forming, where terrorist logistics will be readily available. The failing state apparatus in Afghanistan as in Pakistan is largely permissive for the emergence of such a corridor.

Identifying friends and enemies in this corridor will be a challenge as the lines between terrorist groups will be blurred. Regional states like India and Iran, with their own set of vulnerabilities, will struggle to secure their borders and limit the spread of terrorism.

India has already seen an increase in terrorist incidents in Kashmir. In this context, engagement between India and Central Asia has intensified and efforts are being made to develop a common understanding of the challenges emanating from Afghanistan.

There are indications that signaling greater determination and willingness to work together, India will invite Central Asian states as the main guests for the Republic Day parade in January. Regional security will be a key point on the agenda of the discussions.

Meanwhile, the illicit drug trade is booming in Afghanistan. Without international financial support, narcotics are likely to be a key source of income for the Taliban. Thus, the link between drugs and terrorism will be further deepened in 2022.

The collapse of the Afghan economy and rising unemployment will facilitate the availability of labor for the construction of drug supply networks. The permissive attitude of the Pakistani authorities and the unstable Balochistan will bring a maritime dimension to this matrix.

The region from Pakistan to South Africa is emerging as a key node in the global drug supply chain. Unstable states like Yemen and Somalia and weaker law enforcement and maritime patrol capabilities will further exacerbate these threats.

Narcotics supply routes can be used to transport terrorists, as well as weapons. The presence of radical Islamist groups, including terrorists, in East and Southern Africa could complicate the terrorist challenge throughout the Western Indian Ocean region.

Therefore, developments in the Af-Pak region and the rise of a terrorist corridor will not remain limited to South Central Asia. This will have security implications for the whole region and possibly the whole world. Thus, in 2022, the Af-Pak region will remain at the center of the international security agenda.


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States diverge on police reforms after George Floyd’s murder https://capperi.net/states-diverge-on-police-reforms-after-george-floyds-murder/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 16:07:58 +0000 https://capperi.net/states-diverge-on-police-reforms-after-george-floyds-murder/ DENVER (AP) – Maryland has repealed its half-century-old Law Enforcement Bill of Rights. Washington state reformed use of force policies and created a new agency to investigate when officers use lethal force. And California overcame objections from police unions to make sure officers fired in one jurisdiction couldn’t be hired in another. These are some […]]]>

DENVER (AP) – Maryland has repealed its half-century-old Law Enforcement Bill of Rights. Washington state reformed use of force policies and created a new agency to investigate when officers use lethal force. And California overcame objections from police unions to make sure officers fired in one jurisdiction couldn’t be hired in another.

These are some of the far-reaching policing changes adopted this year in response to the 2020 George Floyd murder in Minneapolis. But the state’s first full year of legislative sessions since his death sparked a summer of racial justice protests produced a much more mixed response across the rest of the country.

A number of states have implemented gradual reforms, such as banning strangulation or tightening the rules around the use of body cameras, while several Republican-led states have responded by granting police yet another more authority and passing laws that cracked down on protesters.

State action on both sides of the debate came as Congress failed to implement police reforms aimed at strengthening officer accountability. The George Floyd Justice in Policing Act passed in the United States House without a single Republican vote, then collapsed in the equally divided Senate.

Jim Pasco, executive director of the Fraternal Order of Police, which represents more than 356,000 law enforcement officers, said he believed it was still possible for Congress to pass reform of the police. police, but perhaps only after another fatal case caught the country’s attention.

“Unfortunately, the only thing we are sure of is going to be a tragedy that precipitates change,” Pasco said.

He said the tendency for states to adopt their own policing measures according to their policy creates more divisions in an already fractured country.

Partisan leanings were at play in Maryland, which 50 years ago became the first state to pass an officers’ bill of rights that included job protections in the police disciplinary process, measures that eventually spread. to about 20 other states. This year, he became the first to repeal those rights after lawmakers in the Democratic-controlled General Assembly overturned Republican Gov. Larry Hogan’s veto.

They replaced the Bill of Rights with new procedures that give civilians a role in police discipline. Democratic lawmakers have also united to pass other reforms over Hogan’s objections or without his signature, including expanding public access to police disciplinary records and creating a unit within the attorney general’s office. state to investigate deaths involving police.

“Other states can use this legislation as a model to create meaningful police reform,” said Rashawn Ray, senior researcher at the Brookings Institute.

In Washington state, a series of sweeping reforms will ban police from using strangles and no-strike warrants, create a new state agency to investigate police use of lethal force, and will change the threshold at which officers can use force. Some law enforcement officials said they were unclear what they were required to do, leading to differences over how to react to certain situations.

California has created a statewide certification system for officers, in part to prevent police officers dismissed in one jurisdiction from finding employment elsewhere. The bill stalled in the legislature last year and struggled to gain support again this year in the face of opposition from police unions. It was adopted after being amended to allow the suspension of the officer’s license as a lesser sentence and to include other guarantees.

“This is not an anti-police bill. This is an accountability bill, ”said Democratic State MP Akilah Weber, who passed the legislation in this chamber. “Without any liability, we lose the integrity of the badge and the link with the community is severed.”

California has also asked the state attorney general’s office to investigate all fatal police shootings of unarmed civilians, clarifying when officers have a duty to intervene to prevent or report excessive force. , and raised the minimum age for becoming a police officer from 18 to 21.

The state reform bills passed in 2021 are important because they help promote police accountability, which can change the behavior of officers as long as the changes are implemented, said project manager Puneet Cheema. Justice in Public Safety at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. .

To try to prevent violent encounters with police in the first place, she said governments need to limit what police are asked to do – for example whether or not they should respond to people facing a mental health crisis or perform certain road checks.

“It’s a longer term shift that will lead to the biggest changes in police violence and the role police play in people’s lives,” Cheema said.

Even some states with divided governments were able to agree on certain reforms.

In Kentucky, Gov. Andy Beshear, a Democrat, signed a partial ban on strike ban mandates approved by the Legislature, where Republicans hold veto-proof qualified majorities. The bill was passed after months of protests against Breonna Taylor’s fatal shooting at her Louisville home in a botched raid last year. It allows no-strike warrants if there is “clear and compelling evidence” that the crime under investigation “would qualify a person, if convicted, as a violent offender.”

Many protesters and some Democratic lawmakers had called for a total ban, but the law prevents cities from banning warrants altogether.

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper, a Democrat, signed a bill passed by the Republican-led legislature that creates a public database where anyone can check whether an officer’s certification has been suspended or revoked. It also creates another confidential database of cases in which an officer kills or seriously injures someone that is only accessible to law enforcement agencies.

In Louisiana, the Democratic governor and lawmakers in the Republican-controlled legislature have placed new restrictions on the use of strangles and no-knock warrants, demanded detailed policies for the use of body cameras and dash cams, spurred law enforcement efforts to recruit minorities and required anti-bias training. They also agreed to require the suspension or revocation of a police officer’s state certificate if the officer commits professional misconduct.

Some fully Republican-controlled states have gone along with the opposition and extended police rights or cracked down on protesters.

In Iowa, Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds introduced measures early in this year’s legislative session to ban racial profiling by police and establish a racial data tracking system for police checks. But lawmakers ditched those sections of his proposal and instead passed the Back the Blue Act, which Reynolds signed in June. The law makes it more difficult to prosecute and obtain damages against police accused of misconduct, makes rioting a felony, and provides legal protection from prosecution for the driver of a vehicle that could strike a protester.

Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt has signed a bill that increases penalties for blocking roads and grants immunity to drivers who kill or injure rioters. This was sparked by an incident in Tulsa last year in which the driver of a van walked through a crowd gathered on a freeway as part of a protest against Floyd’s murder.

In Ohio, people attending a rally accused of violating a riot law could be targeted by a provision normally used against terrorist activity under the legislation proposed by the GOP. Florida also passed a law cracking down on violent protests that had been championed by Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, but a federal judge prevented it from coming into force, calling the law “vague and too broad.”

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Associated Press writers Melinda Deslatte in Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Steve Karnowski in St. Paul, Minnesota; Sean Murphy in Oklahoma City; Gary D. Robertson in Raleigh, North Carolina; Don Thompson in Sacramento, California; and Andrew Welsh-Huggins in Columbus, Ohio, contributed to this report.

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Russian court shuts down prominent rights group – NBC Boston https://capperi.net/russian-court-shuts-down-prominent-rights-group-nbc-boston/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 20:37:03 +0000 https://capperi.net/russian-court-shuts-down-prominent-rights-group-nbc-boston/ Russia’s highest court on Tuesday shut down one of the country’s oldest and largest human rights organizations, the latest step in a relentless crackdown on rights activists, independent media and supporters of the opposition. The Supreme Court’s decision to shut down Memorial, an international human rights group hailed internationally for its studies of political repression […]]]>

Russia’s highest court on Tuesday shut down one of the country’s oldest and largest human rights organizations, the latest step in a relentless crackdown on rights activists, independent media and supporters of the opposition.

The Supreme Court’s decision to shut down Memorial, an international human rights group hailed internationally for its studies of political repression in the Soviet Union, sparked international outrage.

Memorial is made up of more than 50 small groups in Russia and abroad. She was declared a “foreign agent” in 2016 – a label that involves additional government scrutiny and carries strong pejorative overtones that may discredit the targeted organization. Prosecutors said the group repeatedly failed to identify themselves as a foreign agent and tried to cover up the designation, charges Memorial dismissed.

During the hearing, prosecutors also accused Memorial of “creating a false image of the USSR as a terrorist state”, a claim that the group disclosed the authorities’ true motive.

“The Supreme Court ruling once again confirmed that the history of organized and government-led political terror is not an academic question only of concern to experts, but an acute problem of today. hui, “Memorial said in a statement. “Memorial embodies the need of Russian citizens to know the truth about the country’s tragic path and the plight of millions of people. No one would be able to “liquidate” this need. “

The group said it would appeal the verdict and pledged to continue its work.

“Of course, nothing is finished with this,” said Maria Eismont, one of the lawyers who represented the group in court, after the ruling. “We will appeal, and Memorial will live with the people – because these are the people behind who serve this great cause first and foremost. The work will continue. “

A crowd that gathered outside the courthouse on Tuesday erupted into chants of “Disgrace! in response to the decision. Police arrested several people for picketing outside the courthouse.

Council of Europe Secretary General Marija Pejčinović Burić called the decision “devastating news” and “a dark day for civil society in the Russian Federation”.

Amnesty International called the closure of Memorial “a blatant attack on civil society seeking to blur the national memory of state repression” and “a grave insult to the victims of the Russian gulag”.

US Ambassador John Sullivan lamented the court’s verdict as “a blatant and tragic attempt to suppress free speech and erase history.”

The French Minister of Foreign Affairs, Jean-Yves Le Drian, expressed “his indignation and his concern” at the closure of the NGO Memorial International, describing it as “a terrible loss for the Russian people”.

“This announcement is deeply worrying for the future of historical research and the defense of human rights in Russia,” he said in a statement.

Memorial’s sister organization, the Memorial Human Rights Center, is also due to be shut down, with a hearing Wednesday morning at the Moscow City Court.

In recent months, Russian authorities have stepped up pressure on rights groups, the media and individual journalists, appointing dozens of foreign agents. Some have been banned as “undesirable” and several have been forced to close or disband to avoid further prosecution.

Authorities on Saturday blocked the website of OVD-Info – a leading legal aid group that focuses on political arrests – and urged social media platforms to delete its accounts after a court ruled that the website contained materials that “justified the actions of extremists and terrorists.” groups. ”The group dismissed the accusations as politically motivated.

OVD-Info condemned the decision to close Memorial.

“The memorial is an institution of national memory about the era of the Great Terror and the Soviet repressions,” the group said in a statement, adding that its closure amounted to an attempt to justify the crackdowns by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin. “It is a clear signal both to society and to the elites: ‘Yes, repressions were necessary and useful to the Soviet state in the past, and we need them today too.'”

On Tuesday, five associates of jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny were taken into police custody. Earlier this year, a Moscow court banned Navalny’s organizations – the Anti-Corruption Foundation and its nationwide network of regional offices – as extremists, exposing their staff and supporters to prosecution.

One of the five activists detained, Ksenia Fadeyeva, is reportedly accused of having formed an extremist group. Fadeyeva headed the Navalny regional office in the Siberian city of Tomsk, and in last year’s elections she won a seat in the city’s Legislative Assembly.

Another Navalny associate, Lilia Chanysheva, was arrested and jailed in November on similar charges. She ran Navalny’s office in the Russian region of Bashkortostan and faces up to 10 years in prison if found guilty.

Navalny himself is serving 2.5 years in prison for violating his probation terms following a 2014 embezzlement conviction that is widely seen as politically motivated. The politician was arrested in January on his return from Germany, where he spent five months recovering from poisoning with a nerve agent which he said was committed by the FSB security agency on the orders of the Kremlin – accusations Russian officials reject.

On Tuesday, Navalny attended a court hearing regarding his appeal against the prison authorities’ decision to place him under special surveillance as a person prone to “extremist and terrorist” activity.

“Why should I sleep under the sign that says I am a terrorist?” He told the judge by video conference from prison. “I did not detonate anyone, I did not take hostages, I did nothing like that and I do not intend to. It was I who was the victim of an attack terrorist when FSB agents tried to kill me.

Most of Navalny’s key associates have been prosecuted this year on various criminal charges and have left Russia.

Also on Tuesday, another prominent human rights organization – the Civic Assistance Committee which helps refugees and migrants in Russia – said authorities were expelling him from an office in Moscow he had been. allowed to occupy free of charge for years.

Moscow city officials handed the group a document canceling the agreement allowing the use of the space without compensation and ordered it to leave within a month.

“I associate it with the general tendency to destroy civil society in Russia,” Civic Assistance Committee chair Svetlana Gannushkina told Mediazona.

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Vladimir Isachenkov in Moscow and Sylvie Corbet in Paris contributed to this report.


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Richard Marcinko, first in command of Seal Team 6, dies on Christmas https://capperi.net/richard-marcinko-first-in-command-of-seal-team-6-dies-on-christmas/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 03:13:38 +0000 https://capperi.net/richard-marcinko-first-in-command-of-seal-team-6-dies-on-christmas/ Richard “Dick” Marcinko, who was the first commanding officer of US Navy SEAL Team 6, died Saturday at the age of 81, according to an announcement from his son. “Last night on Christmas Eve we lost a hero, also known as The Rogue Warrior, retired Navy SEAL commander AND SEAL Team Six creator, my dad, […]]]>

Richard “Dick” Marcinko, who was the first commanding officer of US Navy SEAL Team 6, died Saturday at the age of 81, according to an announcement from his son.

“Last night on Christmas Eve we lost a hero, also known as The Rogue Warrior, retired Navy SEAL commander AND SEAL Team Six creator, my dad, Richard Marcinko,” tweeted Matt Marcinko Sunday. “His legacy will live on forever. The man died a true legend. Rest in peace dad. I love you forever.”

Marcinko’s passing was also announced on the Navy SEAL Museum’s Facebook page, which said: “Dick Marcinko has played a very unique role in the history of SEAL, leaving a legacy like no other. ‘Demo Dick he is considered the premier counterterrorism operator in the United States. We send our deepest condolences to his family, teammates and friends. “

Marcinko was born on November 21, 1940 in Lansford, Pennsylvania, and enlisted in the United States Marines before being rejected for his lack of a high school diploma. He then enlisted in the US Navy in 1958, eventually rising through the ranks of commanding officer. He would also earn a bachelor’s and master’s degree in international relations and political science, respectively.

He was the first commander of Team SEAL 6 and RED CELL, two of the Army’s top counterterrorism units, which he helped found.

Author and former US Navy SEAL Richard Marcinko arrives at Sapphire &; Day Club on August 1, 2014, in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by Gabe Ginsberg / FilmMagic)

Marcinko was deployed to Vietnam in January 1967 in the 2nd Platoon, SEAL Team 2. He participated in the May 18, 1967 assault on Ilo Ilo Hon, which the Navy described as its most successful SEAL operation during the United States War. Vietnam.

After returning to the United States, Marcinko deployed to Vietnam for the second time, during which he participated in the Tet offensive.

The North Vietnamese put a price on Marcinko’s head for his effective leadership, but he escaped the enemy. He would earn four Bronze Stars, as well as the Silver Star and the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry. In total, he obtained 34 citations and medals.

The second wave of 1st Air Cavalry Division helicopter gunships flies over an RTO and its commander over an isolated landing zone during Operation Pershing during the Vietnam War.  (Photo by Patrick Christain / Getty Images)

The second wave of 1st Air Cavalry Division helicopter gunships flies over an RTO and its commander over an isolated landing zone during Operation Pershing during the Vietnam War. (Photo by Patrick Christain / Getty Images)

After serving as one of two Navy representatives on an unsuccessful task force to free American hostages during the Iran hostage crisis of 1979, Marcinko was hired to design and lead an elite team. counterterrorism, which later became the SEAL 6 team. The name was intended to trick the Soviet Union and other adversaries into believing that the United States had more SEAL teams than it did. .

Marcinko commanded SEAL Team 6 from August 1980 to July 1983. He is also the author of several books, including his best-selling 1993 New York Times autobiography, “Rogue Warrior”. The book will lead to several derivative novels.

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“SEALs who knew Dick Marcinko will remember him as imaginative and daring, a warrior at heart,” Eric Olson told Navy Times. “He was a fiery thug, to be sure, but we’re better off for his unconventional service.”


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Turkish prosecutors ordered 81 people detained for alleged links to Gülen in a week https://capperi.net/turkish-prosecutors-ordered-81-people-detained-for-alleged-links-to-gulen-in-a-week/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 20:28:27 +0000 https://capperi.net/turkish-prosecutors-ordered-81-people-detained-for-alleged-links-to-gulen-in-a-week/ Turkish prosecutors last week ordered the detention of 81 people charged with terrorism because of their alleged links to the Gülen religious movement, local media reported. Istanbul Attorney General’s Office on Tuesday issued arrest warrants for 32 suspects, including former police chiefs who uncovered a network accused of setting up military officers using female escorts […]]]>

Turkish prosecutors last week ordered the detention of 81 people charged with terrorism because of their alleged links to the Gülen religious movement, local media reported.

Istanbul Attorney General’s Office on Tuesday issued arrest warrants for 32 suspects, including former police chiefs who uncovered a network accused of setting up military officers using female escorts to gain information confidentiality of the Turkish armed forces.

On the same day, the chief prosecutors in Ankara and Bursa issued arrest warrants for a total of 46 people, including serving and former military officers and cadets.

Three other suspects were arrested Monday and Tuesday in Denizli and Kayseri provinces for alleged links to Gülen.

The Turkish Justice and Development Party (AKP) government launched a war against the Gülen movement, a global civic initiative inspired by the ideas of Muslim cleric Fethullah Gülen, after corruption inquiries from December 17-25, 2013 that involved then Prime Minister and current Family members and entourage of President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

Dismissing the investigations as a Gulenist coup and conspiracy, the AKP government labeled the movement a terrorist organization and began targeting its members. The government stepped up the crackdown following an attempted coup on July 15, 2016, which it accused Gülen of being the mastermind of. Gülen and the movement firmly deny any involvement in the failed coup or any terrorist activity.

The charges against the suspects include covert communication with their contacts within the movement via public phones.

So-called “public telephone surveys” are based on call recordings. Prosecutors assume that a member of the Gülen movement used the same pay phone to call all of his contacts consecutively. Based on this assumption, when a suspected member of the movement is found in the call records, it is assumed that other numbers called just before or after that call also belong to people with Gülen connections. Periodic reception of calls from a public telephone is also considered an alarm signal. So-called “public telephone surveys” are based on call recordings. Prosecutors assume that a member of the Gülen movement used the same pay phone to call all of his contacts consecutively. Based on this assumption, when a suspected member of the movement is found in the call records, it is assumed that other numbers called just before or after that call also belong to people with Gülen connections. Periodic reception of calls from a public telephone is also considered an alarm signal.

Following the failed coup, the Turkish government declared a state of emergency and carried out a massive purge of state institutions under the pretext of fighting the coup. More than 130,000 civil servants, including 4,156 judges and prosecutors as well as 29,444 members of the armed forces, have been summarily dismissed from their posts for membership of or alleged relations with “terrorist organizations” by emergency decree-laws failing subject neither to judicial nor parliamentary control.

A total of 319,587 people have been detained and 99,962 arrested in operations against supporters of the Gülen movement since the attempted coup, Turkish Interior Minister Süleyman Soylu said on November 22.

In addition to the thousands of people imprisoned, dozens of other supporters of the Gülen movement have had to flee Turkey to avoid government repression.

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Man Charged After Allegedly Transferring Nearly S $ 900 To Fund Terrorist Group https://capperi.net/man-charged-after-allegedly-transferring-nearly-s-900-to-fund-terrorist-group/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 07:33:00 +0000 https://capperi.net/man-charged-after-allegedly-transferring-nearly-s-900-to-fund-terrorist-group/ SINGAPORE (The Straits Times / Asia News Network): A man appeared in district court on Thursday (December 23) after allegedly transferring nearly S $ 900 in total through online platforms to fund terrorist group Hay’at Tahrir al-Syam (HTS). Bangladeshi Ahmed Faysal, 27, who appeared in court via video link, has been charged with 15 counts […]]]>

SINGAPORE (The Straits Times / Asia News Network): A man appeared in district court on Thursday (December 23) after allegedly transferring nearly S $ 900 in total through online platforms to fund terrorist group Hay’at Tahrir al-Syam (HTS).

Bangladeshi Ahmed Faysal, 27, who appeared in court via video link, has been charged with 15 counts under the Terrorism (Suppression of Funding) Act.

In a statement released Thursday, Singapore’s Home Office said Ahmed started working as a construction worker here in early 2017 and radicalized the following year.

He was later drawn to the goal of the Islamic State militant group in Iraq and Syria to establish an Islamic caliphate in Syria.

The MHA added: “In mid-2019, Ahmed Faysal pledged allegiance to (HTS), another militant group fighting to establish an Islamic caliphate in Syria.

“HTS is designated as a terrorist entity under United Nations Security Council Resolutions on the Prevention and Suppression of Terrorism and the Financing of Terrorism.”

According to court documents, Ahmed transferred the money through online platforms JustGiving, Heroic Hearts Organization and GiveBrite from February to October of last year.

He is accused of doing so to help with two fundraising campaigns – Medical Aid Syria and Ramadan 2020 Emergency Homes for Syria.

Court documents do not indicate whether these were facades for HTS.

Each charge is said to involve between $ 5 and around $ 400 in cash.

In its statement, the MHA said it was aware that these funds could be used in whole or in part to benefit the cause of HTS in Syria.

A spokesperson for MHA said: “It is a serious offense under of the law).

“Terrorism and the financing of terrorism pose serious threats to national and international security, and global action is needed to deprive terrorist groups of funding and equipment. Singapore is part of this global effort and is firmly committed to combating terrorist financing, whether or not the funds are used to facilitate terrorist acts locally or abroad.

Ahmed was subsequently arrested under the Homeland Security Act for terrorism-related activities and issued a detention order.

On Thursday, the court heard that he intended to plead guilty on February 16 of next year.

If he is found guilty and sentenced to prison, the detention order against him will be quashed and he will serve the sentence imposed by the court.

To prevent him from spreading his radical ideas to other inmates, he will be held separately while serving his prison sentence.

For each charge laid under the Act, an offender can be jailed for up to 10 years and fined up to $ 500,000.


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Highlights of the Charlie Hebdo attacks in 2015 https://capperi.net/highlights-of-the-charlie-hebdo-attacks-in-2015/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 14:24:23 +0000 https://capperi.net/highlights-of-the-charlie-hebdo-attacks-in-2015/ CNN Editorial Research Here is an overview of the January 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris. From January 7 to 9, a total of 17 people were killed in attacks on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, a kosher grocery store, and the Paris suburb of Montrouge. Three suspects in the attacks were killed by police in separate […]]]>

CNN Editorial Research

Here is an overview of the January 2015 terrorist attacks in Paris. From January 7 to 9, a total of 17 people were killed in attacks on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, a kosher grocery store, and the Paris suburb of Montrouge. Three suspects in the attacks were killed by police in separate clashes. On December 16, 2020, a French court found guilty 14 accomplices of the French Islamist militants behind the attacks.

Facts

Charlie Hebdo magazine began publishing in 1970 with the aim of satirizing religion, politics, and other subjects. Most of the employees were from the Hara-Kiri publication, which was banned after mocking the death of former President Charles de Gaulle.

The Charlie in the title refers to Charlie Brown from the cartoon Peanuts. Hebdo is the abbreviation of weekly, which means weekly, in French.

The magazine ceased publication in the 1980s due to a lack of funds. It resumed publication in 1992.

In 2006, Charlie Hebdo reprinted controversial cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad that originally appeared in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten. French President Jacques Chirac criticized the decision and called it a “manifest provocation”.

In 2011, the magazine’s offices were destroyed by a petrol bomb after it published a cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad.

Profiles of the seventeen victims.

The suspects

Cherif Kouachi:
– Born in France, of Algerian origin.
– During his clash with the police, Cherif Kouachi told CNN affiliate BFMTV that he trained in Yemen with al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP).
– He also told BFMTV that during this time he met Anwar al-Awlaki, the American-born Muslim who was the face of AQAP until he was killed in 2011 during an American drone strike.

Said Kouachi:
– Born in France, of Algerian origin.
– From 2009, Kouachi traveled frequently to Yemen, spending months there in a row.
– US officials said that in 2011, Kouachi received training in weapons handling and worked with AQAP.

Amédée Coulibaly:
– Born in France, of Senegalese origin.
– Arrested in 2010 for attempting to free an Algerian serving a sentence for a 1995 metro bombing and spent some time in prison. Cherif Kouachi was under investigation for the same conspiracy, but there was not enough evidence to charge him.
– Before being killed by the police, Coulibaly reportedly told CNN affiliate BFMTV by phone that he belonged to ISIS.

Hayat Boumeddiene:
– Born in France, of Algerian origin.
– Coulibaly’s girlfriend.
– Initially, it was believed that she had participated in the shooting of a policewoman in Montrouge and the subsequent attack on a kosher grocery store.
– However, a source from the Turkish Prime Ministry told CNN that Boumeddiene entered Turkey on January 2, arriving at Istanbul airport on a flight from Madrid with a man. She had a return ticket to Madrid for January 9, but she did not catch her return flight from Istanbul that day.
– In addition, a French source close to the country’s security services said that it was believed that Boumeddiene was no longer in France and that she would have left for Turkey, “of course to reach Syria”.
– Paris prosecutor François Molins said Boumedienne and Cherif Kouachi’s wife also knew each other well, saying they had exchanged 500 phone calls in 2014.

– In 2020, Boumeddiene is tried in absentia and found guilty of financing terrorism and belonging to a criminal terrorist network.

Chronology

January 7, 2015 –
At around 11:30 am, armed men forcibly entered the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris. The attackers reportedly said they were avenging the Prophet Muhammad and shouting “Allahu akbar”, which translates to “God is great”, according to Molins.

– Twelve people are killed: Eight employees, a guest of the magazine, a maintenance worker and a police officer are killed.

– After fleeing the building, the armed men meet another policeman in the street and shoot him at point blank range.

– Later in the day, the expression “Je Suis Charlie” (“I am Charlie”) starts to be trending on social networks. Thousands of Parisians take to the streets to organize a vigil for the victims.

January 8, 2015 –
– The police name the main suspects, the Cherif brothers and Said Kouachi. The police are looking for them in a district north-east of Paris, near Villers-Cotterêts.

– One killed: an armed man dressed in the same way as those in the Charlie Hebdo attack, all in black and wearing a bulletproof vest, shoots and kills a policewoman in the Paris suburb of Montrouge.

– The Kouachi brothers steal food and gasoline from a gas station near Villers-Cotterets, according to a gas station attendant.

– A US law enforcement official told CNN that the two Kouachi brothers were on a US database of known or suspected international terrorists known as TIDE and have also been on the no-fly list since years.

– In the evening, the Eiffel Tower goes out briefly in memory of the victims.

January 9, 2015 –
– Four people are killed: In the morning, French police and special forces surround a building in Dammartin-en-Goele, north-east of Paris, where the Kouachi brothers are hiding with a hostage.

– In the afternoon, an armed man enters a kosher grocery store at Porte de Vincennes in the Paris suburbs, taking people hostage. The shooter is identified as Coulibaly. The police also link him to the Montrouge attack. His alleged accomplice, Boumeddiene, is also identified. Officials say Coulibaly killed four hostages in the grocery store.

– Around 5 p.m., the police launched an assault on the building in Dammartin-en-Goele, where the Kouachi brothers were hiding. The brothers are killed.

– Shortly after, the police launched an operation against Coulibaly at the kosher grocery store. Four hostages are killed and fifteen are rescued. Coulibaly is also killed.

January 11, 2015 –
– Across France, around 3.7 million people march in anti-terrorism rallies. In Paris, 40 world leaders, including French President François Hollande, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and British Prime Minister David Cameron parade with a crowd of 1, 5 million people.

January 13, 2015 –
– Funeral services are organized in Israel for the four hostages killed in the kosher market. Netanyahu attends.

– Hollande presents the Order of the Legion of Honor, the highest French distinction, posthumously to the three police officers killed in the attacks, during a commemorative ceremony at the Paris Police Prefecture.

– Bulgaria arrests Frenchman Fritz-Joly Joachin under a European arrest warrant, citing suspected links to terrorists and a possible link with the Kouachi brothers.

January 14, 2015 –
– Charlie Hebdo is releasing a new edition of its magazine, with a caricature of the Muslim prophet Mohammed on the cover, holding a sign that says “I am Charlie”.

– AQAP claims the operation carried out on Charlie Hebdo.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2021 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia Company. All rights reserved.


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Canadian pleads guilty in US court for funding ISIS activities https://capperi.net/canadian-pleads-guilty-in-us-court-for-funding-isis-activities/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 15:35:35 +0000 https://capperi.net/canadian-pleads-guilty-in-us-court-for-funding-isis-activities/ By Tom Yun, Editor, CTVNews.ca Click here for updates on this story VANCOUVER, British Columbia (CTV Network) – A Canadian citizen pleaded guilty in U.S. federal court Friday to funding ISIS militants in Syria. In a press release, the US Department of Justice said former Edmonton resident Abdullahi Ahmed Abdullahi admitted to providing material support […]]]>

By Tom Yun, Editor, CTVNews.ca

Click here for updates on this story

VANCOUVER, British Columbia (CTV Network) – A Canadian citizen pleaded guilty in U.S. federal court Friday to funding ISIS militants in Syria.

In a press release, the US Department of Justice said former Edmonton resident Abdullahi Ahmed Abdullahi admitted to providing material support to those involved in ISIS terrorist activities and accepted a sentence of 20 years in prison.

Between November 2013 and March 2014, Abdullahi wired money to his four cousins ​​as well as Douglas McCain, a resident of San Diego, for plane tickets and living expenses. This included US $ 3,100 to McCain, who was the first American known to die for ISIS.

The five individuals traveled from San Diego, Minneapolis and Edmonton to Syria, where they were all killed while fighting for the terrorist group.

The Justice Ministry said Abdullahi also wired money to middlemen in Gaziantep, Turkey, a town 65 kilometers from the Syrian border, which was also used to support those involved in the Islamic State.

Abdullahi also admitted to having committed an armed robbery in an Edmonton jewelry store in order to finance these activities, according to the American authorities. He still faces robbery charges in Canada.

“The accused committed violent criminal acts to obtain money to help finance Douglas McCain’s trip abroad to fight for the Islamic State, where McCain was ultimately killed,” he said. FBI special agent Suzanne Turner in press release.

McCain’s brother, Marchello Dsaun McCain, was convicted in 2018 for illegal possession of firearms and for making false statements to FBI agents regarding his knowledge of the plot, including the role of Abdullahi.

Abdullahi was arrested by Canadian authorities in September 2017 after being indicted by a federal grand jury in California.

An extradition order for Abdullahi was granted by an Alberta judge in May 2018. Canadian federal prosecutors said Abdullahi used draft emails to a shared email address to communicate with his co-conspirators.

At the time, his defense attorney argued that the draft emails were insufficient evidence for extradition. The Alberta Court of Appeal dismissed Abdullahi’s extradition appeal in June 2019. He was extradited to California in October 2019.

Randy Grossman, U.S. District Attorney for the Southern District of California, thanked the RCMP, the Edmonton Police Department, and federal and provincial prosecutors across Canada for their cooperation.

“Terrorist networks cannot survive without people like Abdullahi,” Grossman said in the press release. “Our top priority is to protect Americans from terrorists, and with today’s guilty plea, we have delivered justice to someone who directly funded the violence.”

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