Nearly 200 people pay tribute to victims of Pan Am Flight 103 at annual rose-laying ceremony

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At 2:03 p.m., 37 students emerged from the language room, each wearing a red rose. The bells rang 35 times, but nearly 200 people watched in complete silence as the 35 Remembrance Fellows and two Lockerbie Fellows made their way to the Place of Remembrance on a cloudy Friday afternoon.

Remembrance Fellows were at the rose-laying ceremony to represent students who died in the Pan-American Flight 103 terror attack over Lockerbie, Scotland, and the two Lockerbie Fellows – Lauren Carruthers and Alicia Pagan – were there to represent Lockerbie 11 and Andrew McClune, a Lockerbie scholar who died in 2002 while studying at SU.

On December 21, 1988, Pan Am Flight 103 exploded over Lockerbie when a bomb in the cargo bay exploded as part of a terrorist attack. All 259 passengers and crew, as well as 11 people on the ground, were killed.

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Chancellor Kent Syverud and David Seaman, Dean of League Libraries, joined a group of people including students, alumni of remembrance and the families of the victims who paid tribute to Avery Head who played “Flower of Scotland” on the bagpipe.
Émilie Steinberger | Editor-in-Chief

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“Thirty-three years later, we are still crying,” said Morgan Eaton, who represents Amy Shapiro. “But in the midst of pain and longing are memories, sanctuaries for our grief, solace when peace seems far away, a warm reminder of a fleeting embrace. These memories, when created and shared, have a life.

Each Remembrance Fellow has pledged to look back and act in remembrance of the victim they represent before placing a single red rose on the remembrance wall.

As Ifeyinwa Ojukwu, who represents Gretchen Joyce Dater, placed her rose on the wall, the sun shone in front of the clouds that filled the sky, illuminating the place of remembrance and the people who came to honor those killed in the attack. . Many Remembrance Fellows from previous years were in attendance, some of whom were admiring the sun.

The two Lockerbie fellows reminded the crowd gathered around the memorial that the memory of the tragedy is still alive and well in Lockerbie despite the community’s three decades of healing.

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The two Lockerbie fellows reminded the crowd gathered around the memorial that the memory of the tragedy is still alive and well in Lockerbie despite the community’s three decades of healing. Émilie Steinberger | Editor-in-chief

Pagan, who represents McClune, said the attack rocked so many people beyond Lockerbie and Syracuse. The amount of that day’s losses will never be forgotten, she said.

“If you walk down Lockerbie Main Street today, it looks nothing like it was 33 years ago,” said Carruthers, who represents Lockerbie 11. “I saw the patchwork covering the hole that needed to be filled when an engine landed. at Rosebank (Crescent). I saw the repaired walls at Sherwood Crescent that the wings and fuel tanks destroyed when they landed. I heard the stories that night, as well as the days after.

After scholars lined up behind the monument, participants were invited to lay their own flowers. Chancellor Kent Syverud and David Seaman, Dean of League Libraries, joined a group of people including students, alumni of remembrance and the families of the victims who paid tribute to Avery Head who played “Flower of Scotland” on the bagpipe.

Chaplain Amir Durić closed the ceremony with a message of help to all humanity by honoring people one by one. He said the memories of those who died in the attack on Pan Am 103 will turn the world into a world of peace and justice.

“Future generations will tend to remember those who left behind their lives rather than those who contribute to suffering, evil and darkness,” said Durić. “Their legacies inspire us to live the fullness of the present life and to turn to the light in ourselves, in each other and in the world. “

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